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FREE Webinar Offered by

DH Leonard Consulting & Grant  Writing Services, LLC

targeted to

K-12 District Staff/Teachers and others in Education

Pre-Planning for Effective and Successful Grant Applications

Web-Based Seminar

Date: Thursday, October 17, 2013

 

Time: 9:00 a.m. –  10:00 a.m.

Cost:  FREE!*

Limited Capacity so Register Now!

Presented by Diane H. Leonard, GPC and Rena Beyer, MS

Do you have a plan for how you approach the application process for grant opportunities?  How about when a large application has been identified as a fit prior to the formal release of a NOFA or FOA?  A systematic approach to your pre-application planning will yield winning results.  Having a solid understanding of pre-planning strategies and tools will help your pre-planning efforts be as effective as possible and translate into additional grant dollars.

Reserve your spot using the form below and log-in details for the webinar will be emailed to you in advance.  Please email Diane at diane@dhleonardconsulting.com with any questions.

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*By signing up for this webinar you give permission to DH Leonard Consulting & Grant Writing Services, LLC to be added to their monthly newsletter mailing list.  DH Leonard Consulting & Grant Writing Services, LLC *NEVER* sells or shares its email subscribers information with anyone.

Check out DH Leonard Consulting’s special edition newsletter: K-12 Newsletter, September 2013.  Click on this link (DH Leonard Consulting & Grant Writing Services – K-12 Newsletter – September 2013) to go to the full newsletter which is previewed below.

 

Please note that the *FREE* seminar for K-12 district staff on October 17th has limited capacity, so be sure to register early by emailing or mailing your registration form in early.

DH Leonard Consulting & Grant Writing Services - K-12 Newsletter - September 2013_001

 

 

Join us for this week’s #grantchat

A weekly tweet chat for grant professionals

 

September 10th @ 12pm EST

Topic:  Back to School: K-12 Grants

Guest: Rena Beyer (@rena_beyer)

Hashtag:

#grantchat

 

How:
Via Twitter

Use #grantchat to take part in the hour long discussion that will be moderated by GPA Members and Social Committee Members – Diane H. Leonard (@dianehleonard) of DH Leonard Consulting & Grant Writing Services and Jo Miller (@jm_grants) of JM Grants.

*Don’t forget that Tweet Chat is no longer a tool to use to participate in #grantchat.  Read co-moderator Jo Miller’s post on other options for tools to use to participate in #grantchat: https://jmgrants.com/tweetchat_shutdow/feed

 

#grantchat is supported by

Is it impossible to receive a perfect score from federal grant reviewers?  Almost, but it can be done.  In my thirteen plus years of grant development I have achieved this once on a proposal for a State Education Agency (Advanced Placement Initiative). What does it take to get a perfect score (besides luck and the right review panel)? Of course it takes reading and writing to the criteria and the scoring rubric outlined in the application, and here are three more points to consider:

  1. Understand the grant review process; 
  2. Use what we know about learning styles; and
  3. Write to the audience (review panel).  

Did you miss the Scoring High (Part 1) when Rena talked about understanding the grant review process?  You can read Scoring High (Part 1) here.

2. Use what we know about learning styles.

If you’ve researched learning styles you know that most of us have a preference in how we learn–how we take in information. Remember that peer reviewers have a preference too. Learning styles include visual, auditory, tactile, kinesthetic, and logical. Individuals may have one dominate style or they may respond to more than one type of presentation of material. Hit as many of these as you can in your proposal.  Some examples might include, explaining in narrative and also providing a table or chart to represent data. Include attractive visual elements in your proposal where allowable. Use nice paper if the proposal is submitted in paper copy–the tactile/kinesthetic reviewer may appreciate this effort.

3.  Write With the Audience in Mind.

You would be right to assume the peer reviewers would rather be on the Federal Mall, at museums, or in the hotel bar instead of reading your proposal. Do everything you can to make it easy for them to give you the maximum points and move on to the next application. Do not expect a benevolent heart will overlook areas of weakness in your proposal. As I mentioned before, it is the job of the peer reviewer to be skeptical. Serving as a peer reviewer can be a grueling task–rewarding, but grueling. Cover all bases when explaining and representing information and write well.  Start the planning process for your proposal as early as possible (see earlier related blog post) so you will have sufficient time to write a fully developed proposal.

Here’s wishing you a perfect score (or at least one within the funding range)!

Note:  Thank you to Greg Harlan, Owner of The Grant Connection, Rockport, Texas and Gary Frye, Grant Writer Lubbock-Cooper ISD who generously provided input. Each has extensive experience in serving as peer reviewers.  

Is it impossible to receive a perfect score from federal grant reviewers?  Almost, but it can be done.  In my thirteen plus years of grant development I have achieved this once on a proposal for a State Education Agency (Advanced Placement Initiative). What does it take to get a perfect score (besides luck and the right review panel)? Of course it takes reading and writing to the criteria and the scoring rubric outlined in the application, and here are three more points to consider:

1. Understand the grant review process; 

2. Use what we know about learning styles; and

3. Write to the audience (review panel).  

 

1.       There are two important factors related to understanding the grant review process. These are (a.) understanding who the peer reviewers are and (b.) understanding the peer review process.

 

a.Who are the peer reviewers?   Peer reviewers are selected from across the country (federal grants). They are your peers, who, theoretically, are selected based on their professional background and education, which ideally will match the grant initiative.  This does not necessarily mean they will have extensive background in the area, however. I know this because I’ve served as a peer reviewer on several occasions.  My background and education did relate, but only somewhat on most of these occasions. How will this knowledge assist you in your efforts to develop the perfect proposal? Assume nothing. Do not assume the peer reviewers will be up-to-date on the latest research or acronyms. Especially do not assume the peer reviewers will simply “take your word for it.”  Base your proposal on sound research, and explain it clearly and concisely. Remember, the job of the peer reviewer is to be skeptical, and to use their critical thinking skills to determine the quality of your proposal.

 

b.     What is the grant review process?   Once peer reviewers are selected from across the country by the federal agency, they are either flown to D.C. or are collected electronically to read proposals. The number and length of the proposals vary widely, but the pace is always frantic and stress-inducing.  This stressed out team of strangers (your peer reviewers) become less tolerant as the “completed” pile grows taller. All members of a review panel will carefully read your proposal, compare it with the published guidelines, and assign it a score (usually with 100 points maximum). At some point during this process the peer reviewers meet to discuss your proposal and compare notes and scores. (Usually the pace is read three, discuss the following morning, read three that evening, discuss the following morning, until the task is complete).  The reviewers discuss, change scores if they’ve overlooked something or feel they may have been too generous, and then your proposal goes back to the U.S. Department of Education, where all the reviewed proposals are ranked in order of the assigned scores. What this means is, your proposal must be written so the reviewer can quickly and painlessly find all the information needed to score the proposal.  The proposal should be well written, organized, and include all references needed to support your statement of facts. A well written proposal means the reviewers will not need to search through a muddle of narrative to find the information.

 

As you pause to consider these tips, remember that the less time they need to spend reviewing your proposal, the happier they will be. Make it easy on the reviewers and you will likely see a higher score for your efforts.  Stay tuned for part two of “Scoring High” where I will dig in to #2 and 3.


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